Cabot Links
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Jan 1

Year in Review: Our Top 5’s From 2015

Posted In: Cabot Cliffs Comments: none

What a year!

Between launching preview play at Cabot Cliffs, hosting the PGA Championship of Canada, and being named North America’s Best New Course, there are a few too many highlights to count! With the new year upon us, we decided to take a look back via some of our favourite tweets, reviews and photos from 2015.

 

Did we forget a special moment? Do you have your own Cabot highlights from 2015? Share with us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram!

 Top 5 Tweets from 2015:

 

 We love this tweet about our 2015 preview video! You can view the video here.

teaser video

 

This tweet from @MattGinellaGC was definitely a highlight of our Cabot Cliffs Preview Play Launch back in July!

Matt Giella

 

Not only did we appreciate these kind words tweeted by golf.com, but we also loved the video it links to. One of our favourite pieces of the year! Check it out here.

golf.com video

 

This one is pretty self-explanatory. Being named North America’s Best New Course was an incredible way to end a wonderful season of golf.

golf digest

 

 This shout-out from Rory MacIlroy was pretty awesome.

rory tweet

 

 Bonus tweet – because, well, it’s Anne Murray!

a murray

 

Top 5 Trip Advisor Reviews from 2015:

 

 

review 1

 

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review 5

 

review 4

 

review 3

 

 Top 5  Photos from 2015:

 

 1. This stunning drone shot was taken by Evan Schiller towards the end of the golf season. It offers a unique perspective of the golf course, looking down on the 16th green with a view that stretches right down the coast. We liked it so much we featured it on our Christmas cards! Evan has shared a wide variety of photos from his time at Cabot on his twitter account @Evan_Schiller. Check it out!

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2. This beautiful photo looking back from the 15th green at Cabot Links makes for a wonderful screen-saver!  The photo was taken by James MacLellan, a local amateur photographer. Name sound familiar? That is likely because James is also a caddie at both Cabot Links and Cabot Cliffs!

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 3. This photo of Cabot Cliffs’ 16th is likely etched into the minds of anyone who has played Cabot Cliffs. The iconic photo was taken by Larry Lambrecht of Lambrecht Photography.

Resort golf in Inverness, Nova Scotia

 

 4. No, this photo does not feature coastal views, nor stretching fairways … but it does feature a puppy! This photo of Kaylee, an honourary member of our turf crew, is our most popular instagram photo to date! Credit for this adorable photo goes to Kaylee’s owner, James Bryce, who is the Golf Course Superintendet for Cabot Links.

jbry24 puppy dog at cabot

 

 5. This gorgeous photo of the boardwalk that lines both the beach and the Cabot Links golf course showcases just how close the course is to the ocean. The photo was taken by Patrick Koenig – you can check out more of his work on his instagram page @pjkoenig.

Cabot Links1-106

 

What a year! Between launching preview play at Cabot Cliffs, hosting the PGA Championship of Canada, and being named North America’s Best New Course, there are a few too many highlights to count! With the new year upon us, we decided to take a look back via some of our favourite tweets, reviews and photos … Continue reading Year in Review: Our Top 5’s From 2015

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Dec 17

The Ultimate Last Minute Christmas Gift

Posted In: Uncategorized Comments: none

With only a few days until Christmas, we have officially entered the last minute stage of the gift-buying marathon. Whether you haven’t started shopping, are nearly done, or are just looking for some last-minute stocking stuffers, we have the perfect solution: The Cabot Links Gift Card.

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No matter who you are shopping for, we have the perfect fit. Check out our list below to see what that special someone on your list can turn their gift card into!

The Foodie.

The foodie in your life can turn their gift card into a delicious meal at one of our three onsite restaurants. Whether it’s dining with a view at our Panorama restaurant, a post-round snack at Cabot Bar or artisanal pizza and local craft beer at the Cabot Public House – they will put your gift card to good use! If you’re not sure your favorite foodie will be able to make it to Cabot this year, don’t worry! They can use the gift card towards a Larchwood cutting board from our online shop. Whether used for preparing food or serving it, this chef’s quality end grain cutting board is a foodie’s dream! Click here to learn about how the boards are made, or check them out on our online shop.

Downloadable Menus

 

The Golfer.

Well, this one is obvious. The golfer on your list can turn their gift card into a seaside round at Cabot Links or Cabot Cliffs. They can also use it at our pro shops to buy golf gear, accessories or memorabilia from their time at Cabot. If Cabot is not in the cards this year, your favourite golfer can save the gift card for their next trip, whenever that may be! We also have a great selection of golf accessories and apparel on our online shop which can be purchased anytime from anywhere.

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The Fashionista.

Everyone has one on their list – always looking fabulous and sporting the freshest styles. The Cabot Trading Company is the perfect place for your fashionista to indulge, turning a gift card into gorgeous locally-made jewellery, beachwear or skincare products.

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The New Mom.

What could Cabot possibly have for a new mom? The cutest baby clothes! Check out our line of baby clothes with adorable outfits and accessories, but if you don’t think clothes will do the trick, you can’t go wrong with our fluffy Cabot Teddy bear.

FotorCreated

 

The Deserves-a-vacation (basically everyone).

No matter who you are buying for, a gift card towards a vacation to Cabot Links is a wonderful idea. Work can be stressful and life is busy; what better way to slow down than to visit our coastal town of Inverness, where the biggest stress of the day is deciding between the seafood chowder and the lobster ravioli? If you have someone like this on your list who is planning on visiting us at Cabot, a gift card could be just what they need to put them in the spirit!

Cabot Links

 

 

With only a few days until Christmas, we have officially entered the last minute stage of the gift-buying marathon. Whether you haven’t started shopping, are nearly done, or are just looking for some last-minute stocking stuffers, we have the perfect solution: The Cabot Links Gift Card. No matter who you are shopping for, we have the perfect … Continue reading The Ultimate Last Minute Christmas Gift

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Nov 13

Cape Breton’s Top 10 Fall Photos

Posted In: Cape Breton Comments: none

As the last of autumn’s leaves fall to the ground, we thought we’d reflect on what many consider Cape Breton’s most beautiful season.

While many places experience this transitional time of year, we believe few experience it to the same extent as Cape Breton. Whether you’ve driven the Cabot Trail’s winding roads amongst firey-coloured mountains, hiked seaside trails as crisp briny air filled your lungs, or hit a golf ball into whistling winds while white caps crash nearby – if you’ve experienced fall in Cape Breton, you’ll know what we mean.

To honour the season that offers so much more than pumpkin-spice lattes, we’ve compiled Cape Breton’s Top 10 Fall Photos from around the Island.

If you want more gorgeous photos feel free to follow us on Instagram @cabotlinks, visit our image gallery, or check out Cape Breton’s Top 10 Views.

The Cabot Trail

By Jeff Spackman @namkcaps

Optimized-namkcaps fall photo

Mabou

By Ellen MacEachen

Optimized-Ellen Kennedy MacEachen_Fall beauty

Cape Clear

By Donald MacKenzie

Optimized-Donald G MacKenzie_Cape Clear_ Oct 17 2015

Inverness Trestle

By Fiona MacLellan

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Cabot Cliffs Golf Course

By Evan Schiller @evan_schiller_photography

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Cabot Trail Look Off

By Colin Curry

Colin Cabot Trail

Salmon Pool Trail, Cape Breton Highlands National Park

By Janelle MacDonnell

Cabot Trail Look Off

By Karla Harris @Kiwi_Karla

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Ingonish River Bridge

By Dan Boudreau

Optimized-Dan Boudreau

Clyburn River Valley

By Colin Leese @colinleese

colinleese photo clyburn River Canyon 2_opt

 

 

 

As the last of autumn’s leaves fall to the ground, we thought we’d reflect on what many consider Cape Breton’s most beautiful season. While many places experience this transitional time of year, we believe few experience it to the same extent as Cape Breton. Whether you’ve driven the Cabot Trail’s winding roads amongst firey-coloured mountains, hiked seaside trails as … Continue reading Cape Breton’s Top 10 Fall Photos

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Oct 1

Top 5 Questions About Links Golf Answered!

Posted In: Cape Breton Comments: none
With only 1% of the world’s golf courses considered “True Links”, it’s not surprising that the intricacies of this traditional style remain a mystery to many golfers today. To highlight what differentiates links golf, we chatted with Director of Golf at Cabot Links, Mr. Joe Robinson.
If you still have questions after reading, reach out via twitter @cabotlinks to have your questions answered!

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1. What defines a links golf course?

Links land is where golf originated in Scotland in the 1400’s. It was played along the coast through the sand dunes and uninhabitable land between the ocean and the town. Links courses feature sandy soil, dunal characteristics, and fescue grasses which promote firm and fast conditions. Trees are few and far between on links courses and playing along the sea coast often exposes the golfer to windy conditions.

2. What is different about playing links golf?

If you are used to typical North American golf, you will have to adapt your game to better suit the Links course. It’s important that you play the ball along the ground as much as possible as hitting the high shots common in American golf will not play out the same way. To keep the ball low, the first thing to remember is to swing easy when it’s windy – the old saying goes “when it’s breezy swing easy.” Choke up on the club and take more club than usual. Because the ground is so firm, most times you’ll have to land the ball short of the greens and let it run up to the hole, taking into account the contours of the land. The short game requires more bump and run shots as lofted wedges are difficult to play due to tight lies and often windy conditions. Putting the ball from off the green becomes a better alternative in many cases, even from as far off the green as 30-40 yards.

3. Where is all the signage?

Links golf embraces a simpler game, where bells and whistles are minimalized and the focus is on the game itself and the beautiful surroundings in which it’s played. While signage is kept to a minimum, it does the trick, and with added help from a yardage guide or a caddie, navigating the course is easy.

4. Why is it walking-only?

Links courses are designed to be walking-only. It’s how the game was played hundreds of years ago in the sport’s humble beginnings and it’s the best way to get the true links golf experience. Feeling the turf under your feet as you walk towards your ball, thinking about your next shot and taking in the coastal vistas is an experience that cannot be matched in a power cart. Its golf the way it’s meant to be played.

*If you require a cart for medical reasons, we do have a few on hand – just be sure to book the cart well in advance.  A medical certificate is required and a caddie must drive the cart.

5. Do you recommend getting a caddie?

Absolutely, yes. We highly recommend getting a caddie, especially if it is your first time playing a links course. Caddies allow you to walk the course hands-free and provide assistance with alignment, club selection, yardages, and putting. Their knowledge of the course’s intricacies and history make for an enriching experience.

With only 1% of the world’s golf courses considered “True Links”, it’s not surprising that the intricacies of this traditional style remain a mystery to many golfers today. To highlight what differentiates links golf, we chatted with Director of Golf at Cabot Links, Mr. Joe Robinson. If you still have questions after reading, reach out … Continue reading Top 5 Questions About Links Golf Answered!

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Aug 19

Cabot’s Namesake and Logos

Posted In: Uncategorized Comments: 1

Ever wonder where “Cabot” got its name? You may assume it has something to do with Cabot’s proximity to the world renowned Cabot Trail – and you’re right, but that’s not the full story…

Cabot collage

CABOT-LINKS_LOGO_ONE-COLOR (2)The Cabot Trail was named after the Italian explorer John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto) who reached the shores of Cape Breton in 1497, sailing on a mission for King Henry VII of England. Cabot learned sailing and navigation in Venice from Italian seamen and merchants. By 1488, Cabot moved to England in pursuit of sponsorship for an expedition to Asia. Cabot believed there was a shorter route to Asia via a northern passageway and was given a grant by the King to “seeke out, discover and finde” new lands for England. Cabot was provided with a ship called the Matthew, and in early 1497, Cabot and his crew of 18 men embarked on their north-west journey across the Atlantic in search of Asia. On June 24, 1497, 50 days into the voyage, Cabot landed instead on the east coast of North America on the Island we now know as Cape Breton. The first explorer to reach these shores, Cabot immediately claimed the land for the King of England. When it came time to name our golf resort here on the west coast of Cape Breton Island, we couldn’t think of a more suitable person to pay tribute to than John Cabot. Without John Cabot’s sense of adventure, acceptance of risk, and drive for innovation, North America quite literally would not be the continent it is today. We strive to embrace these values in our everyday work here at Cabot and even feature Cabot’s ship, the Matthew, in our logo.

The Blue Lobster Logo

cropped Cabot Cliffs flag 2When Cabot Cliffs came along, the “name game” was a little more straight-forward. We already had “Cabot”, and “Cliffs” was a pretty natural addition. The logo however, was a bit more challenging – no silhouette of a Cliff seemed to do the real-life Cliffs justice.So we decided to take a more creative route and focus on the rarity of finding such untapped natural beauty in the 21st century. Sticking with the coastal theme, we landed on one of the ocean’s rare finds- the blue lobster. With chances of finding one of these bright blue creatures ranked at 1 in 2 million, we thought it was a perfect fit for our coastal links course on the edge of Cape Breton Island. Just a week before Cabot Cliffs’ Preview Play Launch on July 1st, a blue lobster was caught just off the shore by a local fisherman – a good omen, perhaps, for the season to come.

Ever wonder where “Cabot” got its name? You may assume it has something to do with Cabot’s proximity to the world renowned Cabot Trail – and you’re right, but that’s not the full story… The Cabot Trail was named after the Italian explorer John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto) who reached the shores of Cape Breton in … Continue reading Cabot’s Namesake and Logos

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Aug 6

Top 10: Inverness Sunset Photos

Posted In: Uncategorized Comments: none

The west coast of Cape Breton, where lies the small town of Inverness, has long been known as the “Sunset Side” of the Island. Those who’ve had the pleasure of visiting are likely aware of how this title came to be.

For those who haven’t, there is this list:

 

Golden Links

By Ellen MacEachen

Ellen MacEachern 2

Pink Sky at Night

By Ashley Kennedy MacNeil

rsz_ashley_kennedy_boat_and_harbour_2

Mermaid Hair

By Fiona MacLellan

Fiona MacLellan_Mermaid hair

 

Twilight Tranquility

By Jeff Hutcheson

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Sunset Through The Hay Field

By James MacLellan

James macLellan_Hayfield through the sunset_Facebook_Aug 2

Mirror Image

By Gabriel Alexander MacDonald

Gabriel Alexander Macdonald_Facebook 2

New Horizon

By Stephen Rankin

Optimized-Stephen Rankin_Inverness Beach_email

 Peaceful Setting

By Justin Johnson

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Fetching Light

By Laura MacArthur

Laura MacArthur_Man and Dog

Effervescence

By Lauren Harrison

Lauren Harrison_email_Inverness Sunset From the beach

  world time

The west coast of Cape Breton, where lies the small town of Inverness, has long been known as the “Sunset Side” of the Island. Those who’ve had the pleasure of visiting are likely aware of how this title came to be. For those who haven’t, there is this list:   Golden Links By Ellen MacEachen Pink … Continue reading Top 10: Inverness Sunset Photos

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Jul 9

Q&A with Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw

Posted In: Cabot Cliffs Comments: none

After launching Preview Play on July 1st, we sat down with Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw to talk course design, golf, and Cabot Cliffs:

Coore and Crenshaw

1. What was your first impression when you saw the property for the first time? And what is your impression now, seeing it completed for the first time?

Bill – It’s always special for Ben and me to go out and see one of our courses that our team has worked so hard on take its first steps. I remember walking about it and, much like today, you could see the cliffs and the sand dunes and you could just get a sense of the spectacular nature of the property and the landscape and diversity of it. And now, coming here for the opening and seeing the finished product, you can see that this has the chance to be something spectacular. The landscape has extreme potential for highly interesting golf and hopefully, when it all works itself out, it will be a compliment to the landscape itself.

Ben – We’ve seen a lot of golf courses, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen a prettier sight than this one right here. Right on the Gulf of St. Lawrence, it’s got gorgeous undulations and the movement of the ground is graceful. But you know, there is a lot of pressure on us and I will say this, our task is a hard one. You want to showcase the beauty of this ground and you want to do the very best job you possibly can. It’s an incredible opportunity and if we can possibly come somewhat close to matching the beauty out here in a natural way, we’ll have met our goal – but that’s a tall order.

2. Which holes are you most pleased with and why?

Bill – People often ask what the signature hole is on the course, but for Cabot Cliffs, there isn’t one we could single out as the best hole, most spectacular hole, or most interesting hole. This course presents a lot of different, natural features and that makes for some extremely interesting and unique holes here. It would be impossible to just pick one of them and say ‘oh this is the most beautiful.’ The biggest thing, for me personally, is that I can’t really look at one hole and say ‘I wish we hadn’t done that’ – and that, to me, is almost more important. There is not one hole that doesn’t seem to measure up. They are very complementary to one another as a group of holes and therefore as a golf course.

Ben – People will naturally be drawn to the 16th, 17th and 18th holes because they are close to the end of the round, spectacular, and there is danger involved with playing those holes. But I am very much with Bill on this one. Yes, there are holes that appeal to us in different fashions, but it’s how they fit together, their rhythm, that makes the course special. I must say too, that we would never start out with the idea of having six par 3’s, six par 4’s and six par 5’s – we would never start out with that notion. But, we’ve traversed this ground enough to know that that’s the best sequence on the terrain and in the way of linking up the holes with one another to get from one section of the course to another section, this is what worked best. We usually start on every project with absolutely no conception of what par is, of what the lengths are going to be and how you want to do it – it just worked out this way.

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3. You’ve both played Cabot Links, designed by Rod Whitman. What do you believe has been the most important factor that helped link the two courses together? 

Bill – Well, first of all, Rod is a very good friend of ours. Personally, I’ve known Rod since university in the States. We were so excited for him to get the opportunity to work at Cabot Links, and the golf course that they did there is extraordinary. I saw that site before the work was ever begun and few people will ever know what an incredible job they did to bring that golf course to life. We had a different piece of property at Cabot Cliffs with different features, but the goal for us was to do something that would be complementary to the Links course. It was just – what can we do on this site that will be as interesting in terms of golf as what they did at Cabot Links, but in a somewhat different fashion? The land lent itself to a different style and somewhat different configurations, so the two are completely different courses, but yet compatible in the sense of being interesting and enjoyable. These two courses fit together beautifully in terms of what they present and the type of golf that they offer.

Ben – I played quite a bit of the Links course and they did a spectacular job on that piece of ground. I have a personal affection for it. Rod Whitman from Alberta is the guy that suggested that I meet Bill Coore – that was thirty years ago. Rod was working at the Austin Country Club in Texas for Pete Dye. I saw Rod about 3 or 4 times and one day he said, ‘you know what, you might want to meet my friend Bill Coore.’ So we have that thread. That was a long time ago.

Bill – We are such huge fans of Rod. It would just be hard to understand, not knowing our backgrounds. But he did something that I would quite simply say has ever happened before, in the sense that Rod designed the first course at Cabot Links, and then, willingly, came here and worked with us in the more creative capacity of shaping contours at Cabot Cliffs. I know of no other situation where the architect of one course went and helped build the second golf course at the same facility. And he put forth every possible effort he could to make this the best it could be.

4. Do you think Cabot Links and Cabot Cliffs complement one another enough for visitors to now view Inverness as a golf destination?

Ben – I guarantee you, if people make the trek here, they will see something that they’ve never seen before and they’ll get treated with great hospitality – the people are very welcoming and as far as scenery goes I’ve never seen anything prettier. There are two wonderful golf courses and it’s a great, great thing to be able to travel up here and enjoy this because it is pretty rare in North America and around the world.

Bill – I completely agree with Ben. I think it was Mike Keiser who said ‘one great golf course is a curiosity, but it takes two to make a destination.’ He’s even used the geometric equation of 1 plus 1 is not 2, it’s 3 – and I agree with that. What has been built here with Ben Cowan-Dewar, Mike Keiser, Rod Whitman and all the people who have come to work is so special. They established the reputation of Cabot Links, which will hopefully be magnified now, with the addition of Cabot Cliffs. It’s just a truly spectacular setting. In the case of Cabot Cliffs, a lot of people ask me, what course does it remind you of? Does it remind you of this, that, or the other one? And they use names of very famous golf courses. To me, it’s not something else. This is Cabot. This golf course looks and feels like Cape Breton – it’s meant to do that, and I think it does. We just encourage people to come and see it themselves.

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5. Is the course designed with the average golfer in mind? Or does it lean toward the more skilled player? How did you find a balance so that it is both challenging for the scratch player and still enjoyable for the high handicapper?

Bill – That is the goal. Whatever move you make, you try to include as many classes of golfers as you possibly can. The British Open is going to be played in a couple of weeks in St. Andrews in Scotland which is the pre-eminent example in that anyone with any ability can play that golf course. It’s very unique in the world of golf and most people in our business use it as an example. You must get people around and there has to be something for everyone. If you repeat a theme of insurmountable obstacles, it’s somewhat of a failed proposition. You have to think of routes that people can take and get around the course, but there is enough natural elements about this course that will challenge anyone, of any strike. With a good breeze, this place could challenge some of the best courses in the world – but with a set of completely different tee boxes you can attack it and have fun. It’s meant to be fairly wide. When you have a golf course that’s set this close to a huge body of water, the wind is going to blow and the ground is going to be firm, and therefore you have to have some latitude with which to play – but it is in an effort to consider every class of golfer. You want to expand people’s capabilities and that’s what you try to do. We’ve always said that the easiest thing in the world to do is build a hard golf course – anybody can do that – and I must be real honest, it’s frequently done in a lot of respects these days and it’s too much for a lot of people. So it’s basically how you treat people and how you want to bring them in.

6. Tom Watson said, “no other game combines the wonder of nature with the discipline of sport in such carefully planned ways. A great golf course both frees and challenges a golfer’s mind.” Where at Cabot Cliffs is the golfer’s mind most free and where is it most challenged?

Ben – First of all, in Tom Watson’s case, that is a very succinct way of summing up the experience of a very fine test of golf. There is a great reason why the Scots and the Brits took Tom Watson to their hearts and it is because of the way he plays. He plays without fanfare, he plays quickly, he makes very good quick decisions and he gets on with it. All of us remember the Open championship at Turnberry where with all rights he should have won, but he accepted it with humility and grace. Not a lot of people would have expected that. Golf reveals character, it revealed Tom Watson’s character, which I’ve always admired. Golf can really string your emotions out, especially in a championship when you’re right on the edge a lot of times. It’s debilitating when it doesn’t come off and exhilarating when it does. There are certain junctures around this course that if people play it and get to know it, they will say, ‘you know, this is what it did to me last time I played, this is a challenge.’ It’s the ebb and flow of these holes that stretch your thinking and that was what Tom Watson was getting at with this statement.

Bill – It’s also going to depend on the individual golfer and their strengths, or the best aspects of that golfer’s game. I mean, there are  different holes out here that some people will feel not only exhilaration looking at them, but great anticipation because they are going to go ‘oh this plays to my strengths, I’m a long hitter and this fairway is hugely wide, I can reach this par 5 in 2’ – that’s a very positive feeling. And there will be other places around here that make them go ‘oh man, now I’m in a bit of a bind – I’m not quite sure what to do,’ and a bit of doubt creeps in. Obviously people will talk about the cliff holes a lot and the psychological impact those have because, depending on the lie you take, it’s more of a risky proposition. All the holes out here present opportunities for a lot of very positive feelings and a lot of perhaps second guessing and self-doubt.

After launching Preview Play on July 1st, we sat down with Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw to talk course design, golf, and Cabot Cliffs: 1. What was your first impression when you saw the property for the first time? And what is your impression now, seeing it completed for the first time? Bill – It’s … Continue reading Q&A with Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw

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Jul 2

Cabot’s Canada Day Highlight Reel

Posted In: Uncategorized Comments: none

Oh Canada, it’s been a good one!
With the first official swings taken at Cabot Cliffs, a local golf tournament at Cabot Links and Canada Day Fireworks at dark, Cabot was abuzz yesterday day from sun up until sun down – and beyond. High energy, sunny skies and so many firsts made it a day for the history books.
Read on for the complete highlight reel:

1. Course designer and two time Masters Winner Ben Crenshaw proved he’s still got it, nailing the first tee shot of the day:

 

2. Matt Ginella showcased Cabot Cliffs’ progress with this throwback shot of Bill Coore explaining his vision for the 18th green in 2012, and in the second shot, Cabot Cliffs as a finished product.

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3. Ben Crenshaw set the course record for Cabot Cliffs with a score of 73!

Ben Crenshaw opening Day

 

4. Cabot Links hosted a special Canada Day offer that united Cape Bretoners of all ages and skill level on Cabot turf – $20 tee times!

Cabot Links Kid

 

5. Matt Ginella said this:

Matt Ginella tweet

6. Course designers Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw had their Periscope debut – chatting about the Cabot Cliffs in a live interview!

“To me, it’s not something else. This is Cabot. This golf course looks and feels like Cape Breton – it’s meant to do that, and I think it does.” –Bill Coore

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7. It wouldn’t be Canada Day without Cabot’s annual fireworks display! Guests and locals alike gathered on the Patio at Cabot Bar and the Public House to take in the beautiful show taking place over Cabot’s first tee. Thanks to Francis MacDonald for capturing this shot!

fireworks 4

 

8. After the fireworks display, the Public House burst into a proud, impromptu rendition of “Oh Canada” – a suiting close to a day full of good spirits, genuine pride and excitement for what’s to come.

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Oh Canada, it’s been a good one! With the first official swings taken at Cabot Cliffs, a local golf tournament at Cabot Links and Canada Day Fireworks at dark, Cabot was abuzz yesterday day from sun up until sun down – and beyond. High energy, sunny skies and so many firsts made it a day … Continue reading Cabot’s Canada Day Highlight Reel

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Jun 29

Kitchen Fest 2015

Posted In: Uncategorized Comments: none

After the jam-packed fun of Cape Breton’s first ever KitchenFest!, the island-wide, traditional music festival is back for year two to kick off the 2015 summer ceilidh season!

Cabot will be taking part this year as one of the 18 venues hosting the event. The Cabot Public House will host entertainment every night this week. The cost is $5 at the door.

Read on for full details on this weeks line up:

 

Monday, June 29th, 2015

PUB NIGHT  at Cabot Public House

7:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Cabot Public House

Address: 15933 Central Ave Inverness

Lineup: The East Pointers, Rankin MacInnis

 

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015

PUB NIGHT at Cabot Public House

7:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Cabot Public House

Address: 15933 Central Ave Inverness

Lineup: Dwayne Côté, Hilda Chiasson, Gillian Boucher, Scott MacMillan

 

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

PUB NIGHT at Cabot Public House

7:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Cabot Public House

Address: 15933 Central Ave Inverness

Lineup: Wendy MacIsaac, Mairi Rankin, Jackie Dunn MacIsaac

 

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

PUB NIGHT at Cabot Public House

8:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Cabot Public House

Address: 15933 Central Ave Inverness

Lineup: Howie MacDonald, Brenda Stubbert, Clarence Deveau, Tracey MacNeil

 

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

PUB NIGHT  at Cabot Public House

8:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Cabot Public House

Address: 15933 Central Ave Inverness

Lineup: Dawn & Margie Beaton, Cyril MacPhee, Amanda MacDougall

 

 

After the jam-packed fun of Cape Breton’s first ever KitchenFest!, the island-wide, traditional music festival is back for year two to kick off the 2015 summer ceilidh season! Cabot will be taking part this year as one of the 18 venues hosting the event. The Cabot Public House will host entertainment every night this week. … Continue reading Kitchen Fest 2015

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Jun 24

Cape Breton’s Top Ten Views

Posted In: Cape Breton Comments: none

When Cape Breton was ranked the third best island in the world by Travel and Leisure Magazine, there is no doubt some of those who have never visited were left wondering – just what’s so special about this place anyway? Well, aside from the unique fusion of Celtic and Acadian culture, music, and welcoming people – Cape Breton’s raw, natural beauty is what truly sets it apart. With so many views to choose from, picking only ten was no easy task, but we came up with a list of awe-inspiring locations that should be on everyone’s Cape Breton bucket list!

1. Skyline Trail

CBHNP Skyline Sunset Hike

One of the Cape Breton Highlands’ National Parks, the Skyline Trail is likely the most talked about trail experience on the island. While the 7.5 kilometer loop features various viewpoints and wildlife sightings along the way, the Skyline’s world renowned reputation isn’t truly realized until the trail’s end. Hikers are rewarded with an eagle-eye view atop a dramatic headland cliff overlooking the rugged coast, vast ocean, and winding Cabot Trail below. The captivating backdrop makes for beautiful picnics, peaceful yoga and, most importantly, the ultimate selfie opportunity.

If you want to see moose, bears, boreal birds, whales, and an unforgettable view, the Skyline Trail is a must for your next trip to Cape Breton.

 2. Cape Clear Look Out

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Looking out over the Highlands and the Northeast Margaree River valley, and featuring a 300ft drop, Cape Clear is not for the faint of heart. For those willing to brave the heights, Cape Clear is a great spot for a picnic. The lookout is clear of trees and most vegetation due to its rocky, granitic surface, which makes for clear views all around. A thrill-seekers paradise, Cape Clear is also known as a rock climbing destination – yikes!

 3. Magic Cove

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While the long and bumpy dirt road to Magic Cove may be discouraging to some, the view upon arrival more than makes up for it. After parking on the roadside, a short steep trail leads visitors down to the small beach. Along the trail, a small lookout exposes the Cove in all its beauty – an aqua-blue splash contrasted by enormous cliffs of dark jagged rock. The Cove’s calm waters are ideal for snorkeling, while a beach complete with a small cave, a waterfall, and a river make for a day’s worth of adventure.

 4. Broad Cove Marsh Road

Boradcove marsh road

With rolling hills, dramatic cliffs and the vast ocean around each turn, this meandering coastal road has a special way of slowing things down. Only a short drive from Cabot Cliffs, this is not one to be missed!

 5. Franey Mountain

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Located along the Cabot Trail in Ingonish, Franey Mountain offers a diverse 360-degree view encompassing the Atlantic coastline, the Middle Head Peninsula, and the Clyburn brook canyon. Cape Smokey and surrounding mountains also make it into view from this 425m high vantage point.

 6. Mabou Coal Mines

Steve Luxton_Mabou Coal Mines

Featuring a dainty wharf and known by locals for its amazing cliffs, rolling hills, and a maze of trails that lead high into the Mabou Highlands, the Mabou Coal Mines offers post-card quality photo ops from every angle.

 7. Egypt Falls

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Not far from Lake Ainslie, the largest fresh water lake in all of Cape Breton, lies Egypt Falls. The trail leading to the falls is only 15 minutes, descending downhill through a stand of mixed hardwoods. The last five minutes forces you to ascend the steep walls of the gorge, revealing a beautiful waterfall. A great spot to have a swim, relax in nature with a picnic and some good company. If you’re feeling brave, you can climb to the second level to find a large natural pool and a birds-eye view of the river below.

 8. Meat Cove

Meat Cove
Perhaps the most remote community in all of Nova Scotia, Meat Cove is a tiny fishing village located along the Cabot Trail at the northernmost tip of the province. A campground located directly along a rugged cliff offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean. Meat Cove’s pure isolation, wide-open ocean views, and immersion of nature gives visitors the majestic sense that they aren’t only at the tip of the province, but rather, the outermost edge of the world.

 9. Cabot Cliff’s 17th Tee Box

Resort golf in Inverness, Nova Scotia

Okay, we know, we’re a little biased – but with a view encompassing miles of rugged coastline, blue ocean, green fairways and the magnificent Highlands as a backdrop– can you blame us? Cabot Cliffs will be opening for preview play on July 3rd, so you can see this one with your own eyes this summer.

 10. Trestle

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Located along the Trans Canada Trail just off Inverness’ Central Avenue, this spectacular bridge is about 140 paces long and sits roughly 50 meters above the Broad Cove River, or “Big River” as it is known locally. The Trestle is a great spot for trail hikers and bikers alike to stop and stretch their legs – taking in the view of the surrounding highlands and the river below as it twists its way to the Gulf of Saint Laurence.

 

When Cape Breton was ranked the third best island in the world by Travel and Leisure Magazine, there is no doubt some of those who have never visited were left wondering – just what’s so special about this place anyway? Well, aside from the unique fusion of Celtic and Acadian culture, music, and welcoming people … Continue reading Cape Breton’s Top Ten Views

Read More